Research on Bullying Prevention in AJO

Lorenzo-Blanco, E.I.; Unger, J.B.; Oshri, A.; Baezconde-Garbanati, L.; & Soto, D. (2016). Profiles of Bullying Victimization, Discrimination, Social Support, and School Safety:  Links with Latino/a Youth Acculturation, Gender, Depressive Symptoms, and Cigarette Use. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry 86(1), 37-48. 

Abstract

Latino/a youth are at risk for symptoms of depression and cigarette smoking but this risk varies by acculturation and gender. To understand why some youth are at greater risk than others, we identified profiles of diverse community experiences (perceived discrimination, bullying victimization, social support, perceived school safety) and examined associations between profiles of community experience and depressive symptoms, cigarette smoking, acculturation, and gender. Data came from Project Red (Reteniendo y Entendiendo Diversidad para Salud), a school-based longitudinal study of acculturation among 1,919 Latino/a adolescents (52% female; 84% 14 years old; 87% U.S. born). Latent profile analysis (LPA) revealed 4 distinct profiles of community experience that varied by gender and acculturation. Boys were overrepresented in profile groups with high perceived discrimination, some bullying, and lack of positive experiences, while girls were overrepresented in groups with high bullying victimization in the absence and presence of other community experiences. Youth low on both U.S. and Latino/a cultural orientation described high perceived discrimination and lacked positive experiences, and were predominantly male. Profiles characterized by high perceived discrimination and /or high bullying victimization in the absence of positive experiences had higher levels of depressive symptoms and higher risk of smoking, relative to the other groups. Findings suggest that acculturation comes with diverse community experiences that vary by gender and relate to smoking and depression risk. Results from this research can inform the development of tailored intervention and prevention strategies to reduce depression and/or smoking for Latino/a youth.  
http://psycnet.apa.org/index.cfm?fa=buy.optionToBuy&id=2016-00321-003


Evans, C.B.R.; & Chapman, M.V.  (2014).  Bullied Youth:  The Impact of Bullying through Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Name Calling.  American Journal of Orthopsychiatry 84(6), 644-652.

Abstract

Bullying is a common experience for many school-aged youth, but the majority of bullying research and intervention does not address the content of bullying behavior, particularly teasing. Understanding the various forms of bullying as well as the language used in bullying is important given that bullying can have persistent consequences, particularly for victims who are bullied through biased-based bullying, such as being called gay, lesbian, or queer. This study examines bullying experiences in a racially and ethnically diverse sample of 3,379 rural elementary-, middle-, and high-school youth. We use latent class analysis to establish clusters of bullying behaviors, including forms of biased-based bullying. The resulting classes are examined to ascertain if and how bullying by biased-based labeling is clustered with other forms of bullying behavior. This analysis identifies 3 classes of youth: youth who experience no bullying victimization, youth who experience social and emotional bullying, and youth who experience all forms of social and physical bullying, including being bullied by being called gay, lesbian, or queer. Youth in Classes 2 and 3 labeled their experiences as bullying. Results indicate that youth bullied by being called gay, lesbian, or queer are at a high risk of experiencing all forms of bullying behavior, highlighting the importance of increased support for this vulnerable group.
http://psycnet.apa.org/index.cfm?fa=buy.optionToBuy&id=2014-57192-007


Hong, J.S.; Davis, J.P.; Sterzing, P.R.; Yoon, J.; Choi, S.; & Smith, D.C. (2014).  A Conceptual Framework for Understanding the Association between School Bullying Victimization and Substance Misuse.  American Journal of Orthopsychiatry 84(6), 696-710. 

Abstract

This article reviews current research findings and presents a conceptual framework for better understanding the relationship between bullying victimization (hereafter referred to as victimization) and substance misuse (hereafter referred to as SM) among adolescents. Although victimization and SM may appear to be separate problems, research suggests an intriguing relationship between the 2. We present a brief, empirical overview of the direct association between victimization and adolescent SM, followed by a proposed conceptual framework that includes co-occurring risk factors for victimization and SM within family, peer, and school and community contexts. Next, we discuss potential mediators linking victimization and SM, such as internalizing problems, traumatic stress, low academic performance, and school truancy and absence. We then identify potential moderating influences of age, gender and sex, social supports, and school connectedness that could amplify or abate the association between victimization and SM. Finally, we discuss practice and policy implications.
http://psycnet.apa.org/journals/ort/84/6/696.pdf&productCode=pa&uid=2014-57192-011 


Berkowitz, R.; & Benbenishty, R. (2012).  Perceptions of Teachers' Support, Safety, and Absence from School because of Fear among Victims, Bullies, and Bully-Victims.  American Journal of Orthopsychiatry 82(1), 67-74.  

Abstract

This study examines the distribution of the types of involvement in school violence (bullies, victims, bully‐victims, and students not involved in violence) among the general population of Israeli school students. The prevalence of these different types of involvement was also examined according to gender, age or school level (junior high vs. high school), and ethnicity (Jewish vs. Arab). Further, the study examines the relationships between type of involvement in school violence and students’ perceptions of teachers’ support, safety, and absence from school because of fear. Data were obtained from a nationally representative, stratified sample of 13,262 students in grades 7–11 who responded to a self‐report questionnaire on victimization by, and perpetration of, school violence and on perceptions of school climate. Data revealed that 3.6% of all students were victims of bullying (18.5% of those involved in violence). The proportion of bully‐victims among male students was 6.4% (21.9% of all involved) compared with 1.1% (11.2% of all involved) among females. Bully‐victims reported the lowest levels of teacher support and feelings of security and missed school because of fear significantly more often. The results point to the uniqueness of the bully‐victim group. This group presents multiple challenges for school staff with these students needing special attention.
http://psycnet.apa.org/index.cfm?fa=buy.optionToBuy&id=2012-01560-008 


Mishna, F.; Cook, C.; Gadalla, T.; Daciuk, J.; & Solomon, S. (2010).  Cyber Bullying Behaviors among Middle and High School Students.  American Journal of Orthopsychiatry 80(3), 362-374.

Abstract

Little research has been conducted that comprehensively examines cyber bullying with a large and diverse sample. The present study examines the prevalence, impact, and differential experience of cyber bullying among a large and diverse sample of middle and high school students (N = 2,186) from a large urban center. The survey examined technology use, cyber bullying behaviors, and the psychosocial impact of bullying and being bullied. About half (49.5%) of students indicated they had been bullied online and 33.7% indicated they had bullied others online. Most bullying was perpetrated by and to friends and participants generally did not tell anyone about the bullying. Participants reported feeling angry, sad, and depressed after being bullied online. Participants bullied others online because it made them feel as though they were funny, popular, and powerful, although many indicated feeling guilty afterward. Greater attention is required to understand and reduce cyber bullying within children’s social worlds and with the support of educators and parents. 
http://psycnet.apa.org/index.cfm?fa=buy.optionToBuy&id=2012-11010-010 


Olweus, D.; & Limber, S.P.  (2010).  Bullying in School:  Evaluation and Dissemination of the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program.  American Journal of Orthopsychiatry 80(1), 124-134.

Abstract

The nature and extent of bullying among school children is discussed, and recent attention to the phenomenon by researchers, the media, and policy makers is noted. The Olweus Bullying Prevention Program (OBPP) is a comprehensive, school-wide program that was designed to reduce bullying and achieve better peer relations among students in elementary, middle, and junior high school grades. Several large-scale studies from Norway are reviewed, which provide compelling evidence of the program’s effectiveness in Norwegian schools. Studies that have evaluated the OBPP in diverse settings in the United States have not been uniformly consistent, but they have shown that the OBPP has had a positive impact on students’ self-reported involvement in bullying and antisocial behavior. Efforts to disseminate the OBPP in Norway and the United States are discussed.
http://psycnet.apa.org/index.cfm?fa=buy.optionToBuy&id=2010-13348-015